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NFC: Near Field Communication of Near Fail Communication?

NFC: Near Field Communication of Near Fail Communication?

You’ve probably heard of NFC, which of course stands for Near Field Communication. It’s basically a method of communication between smartphones (or between smartphones and… other things) which allows the user to simply bump their handset against a compatible device to exchange data. It’s all the rage in new handsets, with all the big manufacturers jumping onboard. Engadget reported that 30 million NFC phones shipped in 2011, and estimate that this number could reach 700 million by 2016. Currently, if you’re dying to get your hands on NFC technology, you can find it in handsets like the Samsung Galaxy Nexus, the BlackBerry Curve 9380 and the LG Optimus Vu. These are all pretty high-end handsets, but you don’t have to splash the cash to get your mitts on NFC; Nokia have released a few budget-ish phones with the technology included, such as the Nokia 700 and the Nokia 701. More recent handsets with the technology onboard include the HTC One X, the Sony Xperia Ion, and even budget models like the Samsung Galaxy Ace 2. So, now that we know what it is and how to get our greedy hands on it, what’s it actually for? Well, other than the obvious ‘data exchange’ answer, one of the big ideas getting batted around is using NFC technology for instant payments. So rather than having to get your debit card out every time you want to pay for something, you’ll just be able to whip your phone out and scan it in, a little like the way Londoners use an Oyster card. This has been talked of for quite a while, but it’s beginning to look like the wheels are finally in motion to actually do something about it, in the form of Bump Pay. Bump Pay is a new app which allows users to type in the amount of money that they want to send to a friend and then simply ‘bump’ their handsets together to send it via Paypal. It’s only available on iOS at the moment, but it will no doubt be extended to Android in the near future. Bump say that their app is primarily designed to make paying friends back for small things – splitting dinners or paying for petrol money – simpler, faster, and easier. Bump Pay has already been downloaded by over 80 million users, which may well be an indication that NFC technology is set to take off when it gets going properly in the UK. However, whether it will get going properly in the UK is anyone’s guess. There’s been talk for months about installing NFC payment facilities in place around London in time for the 2012...

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HTC One X may have The Deathgrip issue

HTC One X may have The Deathgrip issue

As the saying goes nothing is perfect, so seems the case of any consumer device. When it comes to handsets though design flaws normally tend to surface sooner rather than later. Even though companies take pains taking time to go over the device so even the minutest of details is checked, yet flaws occur. If any one of you remember that expensive little device which you had to hold in a certain way so not to lose reception. Doesn’t matter how big a company is , no one can avoid the “design flaw syndrome”.  If you can recall, when the Nexus One was launched, it had major multi-touch issues, or when the HTC EVO 4G was released, due to improper mounting of screens, resulted in cracks on the device body. Recently HTC has seemed to caught this bug too, to be more precise, an issue has risen up for their 2012 flagship phone the One X. The HTC One X released in UK last week and according to reviews by Cnet, the device has some minor build quality issues. The problem, in context is that the screen gets discoloration when a finger is pressed hard on either side of the device. A ripple effect on the screen can be seen where the finger is placed. Now even though this minor issue can be seen on a lot of device screens, this is not the cause of concern. Natasha Lomas from Cnet mentioned that just gripping the device tightly can cause unwanted screen selections, even without touching the screen. Now this can be made a bit clearer as to what Natasha is saying by this video: This problem was addressed to Mr. Daniel Hundt, Creative Director for Design Consultancy, and he said: “I was not aware of that — maybe this is not a shipping build. He also assured that the company would never let a device be allowed to ship with such an issue. Well one question still remains is that the issue is limited to demo versions given to the press for reviewing, or the design flaw would be found in retail units as well much to the horror of  consumers. All users who are using the One X have found such an issue?? Any issue for that matter.  Feel free to comment and give us your views.   Source:...

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Disabling HTC System Apps – A Major No No

Disabling HTC System Apps – A Major No No

Everybody likes to be in control, Google has kept this in mind when making the Android 4.0. A lot of people really like the fact that ICS users can disable a lot of system applications. System applications sometimes are no use for us, and keep on eating away at the battery in the background. What Android 4.0 does, when you disable a system app, is that it does not delete the application completely, just pauses it, so it doesn’t keep on being a nuisance.   There are a number of system apps which you should not mess around with if you are not crystal clear on what your trying to do. The phones (One X and One S) running HTC Sense 4.0 have a lot of such apps which should not be messed around with, yet they are quite intriguing enough to make you want to shut them down. According to a review of both these phones there are system applications, like “phone and “dialer” to name a few. The strange bit is that there are two separate contacts apps as well, having a measly size of 8k and 28k respectively. Now the reason why you should not mess around with shutting these apps is because, if you disable one of the contacts apps, the phone and the dialer app stop working. If you disable the other contact apps the phones whole User Interface (UI) resets. (which would be very very bad for your device). This is not it, if you will disable the phone or dialer app, then the debugger goes completely hay wire. Trust me when i say this, you do “Not” want this to happen! As these phones are relatively new, the reason as to why this happens has not been disclosed by HTC as yet. It will not be too long when the phones will be shipped off with a more stable version, hopefully the final version of the software, pure and without any bugs. So till then, what we at Talk Android Phones suggest is that those who own these devices running HTC Sense 4.0, just enjoy it the way it is for the moment. As, at this moment messing around with your new phone just does not make any Sense (pun...

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Google’s Play Store catches a bug

Google’s Play Store catches a bug

Google’s Play Store has been one of the hottest topics of late. Now, there is another news that has stirred up a buzz, the Google Play Store has caught a bug. The symptoms are that users are finding their paid applications disappear from their My apps list. The paid applications have stopped showing and the users are either getting blank spaces or RPC (Retrieving information from server) errors.Some users have also reported that they can see the purchase history of their apps in Google Wallet but are not showing in their Play account. The problem according to sources has been seen in stock as well as rooted phones. Now. if the bug started from one of the custom ROMs its hard to tell at this stage. It has been more than 3 days and Google has yet to give an official statement for this situation, but knowing them, they surely be searching for a solution as we speak. If any of you tend to have this problem please let us know via your comments.   Source: Device...

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Tricky Malware might prove to be a challenge for Google Bouncer

Tricky Malware might prove to be a challenge for Google Bouncer

Recently Google had introduced everyone to its new malware detection tool, Bouncer which apparently keeps malware and unsecured apps out of the reach of the general public and also giving people a sigh of relief and the freedom to download even more crazy apps from the market without having to actually bother for any unknown threat. Well from the looks of things it seems that Google would want to tweak its protection tool a little bit more specially after a recent report released by Forbes, a North Carolina State University professor detailed on his blog how he and his team discovered a new malware threat that when installed, can evade virus scans and permission requests, making any wrong doing virtually undetectable. Dubbed “Rootsmart, ” the app uses a process called “privilege escalation” that after having been installed for a few hours (days even), will begin downloading new code from a remote server hiding the data transfer in the phone’s normal communications. The downloaded code is the ever popular “Gingerbreak” exploit that we’ve told you guys about in past which is able to gain complete access to a device’s SMS, phone calls, data — even recording sensitive phone conversations. Theoretically, Bouncer wouldn’t be able to detect malware in the app because the known malware (Gingerbreak in this case) wouldn’t initially be found in the app. The cat-and-mouse game continues and like we’ve learned so many times in the past, where there are evil doer’s, nothing can ever be 100% foolproof. Although the offending code has yet to be found anywhere in the Android Market (only a few 3rd party Chinese apps have been detected with this malware) one should always be cautious when installing apps from unknown sources especially suspicious sites offering free pirated apps online.   Source: Forbes...

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McAfee Security App for Android Devices

McAfee Security App for Android Devices

McAfee has established itself as pioneer in the development of security as well as anti-virus software protection for computers as well as laptops. Good news is that McAfee has released for the first time a security app for the android based devices. It has been named as Mobile Security 2.0. Mobile security 2.0 comes with the following features; App management Text as well as voice blocking features Anti-virus protection Anti-theft protection App Alert Feature Online Portal to locate as well as recover a lost phone McAfee Mobile Security 2.0 app is available for download from the Android Market and the app comes with a price of around $29.99 on a yearly basis. The existing McAfee mobile security subscribers will be getting a free update. The latest ‘App Alert’ feature helps the users in reviewing permission that are required by an app. The app alert feature helps the users in detecting the presence of any kind of malicious app....

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